The HUD tracks a variety of poker statistics. Below is an explanation of the different statistics available in the HUD. Once you are familiar with the meaning of the statistics and abbreviations, you can use them as a tool in your game.

Hands Played / Hands sat in (#)

This is the total number of hands you were in. In order for the rest of the statistics to be reliable, they should be based on a large number of hands. Ideally, you should play at least 10,000 hands to gain an accurate picture of your playing style.

In tournaments, “Hands Played” includes hands where you were sitting out, whereas these hands are not counted in ring games. So in tournaments you can also consult “Hands sat in”. In tournaments, a player sitting out must still pay blinds, and can feasibly win hands if the player’s stack is small enough that paying the blinds or antes forces the player all-in. This can distort statistics so where possible we use the player’s “Hand sat in” statistic as the basis for calculating other preflop statistics.

Big Blinds Won / 100 Hands (TBB)

Your winnings for each hand are expressed as a number of big blinds. For example, if you win $2.30 on a table where the big blind is $0.10, then your winnings for that hand are 23 big blinds. Your wins and losses as a number of big blinds are averaged and multiplied by 100. This results in a normalized value useful for comparisons, regardless of the stake level of each table.

Preflop Statistics

Voluntarily Put $ in Pot (VPIP)

This measures how often you voluntarily invested money into a hand. Paying the big blind, the small blind, or the ante is not considered voluntary. Therefore this percentage indicates how often you called, bet, or raised. The lower this value, the tighter your hand selection is. The higher, the looser. Just how tight or loose depends on how many opponents you are playing against. The formula for calculating VPiP is:

Voluntarily put $ in pot % = (times voluntarily put $ in pot) *100 / (Hands played)

VPIP is a bedrock of online poker, and you should consult it frequently where analyzing your own play and the tendencies of your opponents.

Preflop Raise (PFR)

The PFR statistic indicates how often you have raised before the flop is seen. A high value is an indicator of an aggressive player. A low value indicates a passive player. The formula for calculating PFR is:

Pre-flop raise % = (times pre-flop raised) * 100 / (Hands played)

VPIP and PFR should be consulted together, as PFR hands will always be a subset of VPIP hands.

Flops Seen (FS)

This indicates in what percentage of hands you reached the flop without folding. This statistic counts every hand, regardless of whether you reached the flop without betting (for example, if you were in the big blind). Generally you should prefer to use VPIP and PFR instead of this statistic. That’s because VPIP and PFR reflect player preflop betting tendencies.

Called Preflop Raise (CPFR)

This is a measure of how often you called another player’s pre-flop raise, when you have the opportunity to do so. The formula for calculating CPFR is:

Called preflop raise % = (times called preflop raise) * 100 /
(number of opportunities to call preflop raise)

Unopened Preflop Raise (UOPFR)

This is a measure of how often you raised preflop when all players before you have called or folded. The formula for calculating UOPFR is:

Unopened preflop raise % = (times made an unopened preflop
raise) * 100 / (number of opportunities to make an unopened
preflop raise)

Three-bet Pre-flop (3B)

This is a measure of how often you three-bet pre-flop. In pre-flop betting, to three-bet is to raise after exactly one other player has raised. The formula for calculating 3B is:

Three-bet preflop % = (times three-bet preflop) * 100 / (number of three-bet preflop opportunities)

Four-bet Preflop (4B)

This is a measure of how often you four-bet (or higher) preflop. Four-betting is similar to three-betting, except that you are re-raising after a player has already re-raised. The formula for calculating 4B is:

Four-bet preflop % = (times Four-bet preflop) * 100 / (number of Four-bet preflop opportunities)

Folded to Three-Bet Preflop (F3B)

This measures how often you folded to another player’s three-bet pre-flop, when you have the opportunity to do so. The formula for calculating F3B is:

Folded to three-bet preflop % = (times folded to three-bet preflop) * 100 / (number of opportunities to fold to three-bet preflop)

Folded to Three-Bet is also broken down into “in position” (IP) and “out of position” (OOP). You are “in position” if you are closer to the button than the person who made the 3-bet. You are “out of position” if the person who made the 3-bet is closer to the button than you are.

Notes on fold to 3-bet:

  • You are only considered to have a “fold to 3-bet” opportunity if you made the initial raise. If player A raises, and player B reraises, and now player C has to act, only player A has a “fold to 3-bet” opportunity. Player C does not have a “fold to 3-bet” opportunity. We do this because if you have not yet made your opening action, and you are already facing two raises, you’d probably fold almost every single hand. This is not useful information to add to the “fold to 3-bet” stats. However, it is important to know how people respond when their initial raise is re-raised.

Folded to Four-bet Preflop (F4B)

This measures how often you folded to another player’s four-bet preflop, when you have the opportunity to do so. The formula for calculating F4B is:

Folded to four-bet preflop % = (times folded to four-bet preflop) * 100 / (number of opportunities to fold to four-bet preflop)

Notes on fold to 4-bet:

  • You are only considered to have a “fold to 4-bet” opportunity if you made made the 3-bet.

Squeeze Bet (Sq)

This is a measure of how often a player makes a squeeze bet preflop. A squeeze bet is made by a player when all of the following occur:

  1. A villain makes an initial preflop raises (the “raiser”)
  2. One or more players call the raise before the action comes to the hero (the “caller”)
  3. The hero re-raises the villain. (the “squeezer”)

There must be at least one caller and no re-raise between villain and hero to define a squeeze. This play gets its name because the squeezer appears to be attempting to “squeeze” the caller out of the hand.

Squeeze bet % = (times made a squeeze bet) * 100 / (number of squeeze bet opportunities)

Squeeze Bet is also broken down into “in position” (IP) and “out of position” (OOP). You are “in position” if you are closer to the button than the raiser. You are “out of position” if the raiser is closer to the button than you are.

Fold to squeeze bet when raiser (FSqR) and when caller (FSqC)

This indicates how often a player folds when confronted with a squeeze bet.

Fold to Squeeze bet % = (times folded to a squeeze bet) * 100 / (number of fold to squeeze bet opportunities)

Note that if the squeezer is reraised before the play returns to the initial preflop raiser, we consider that the raiser and caller are no longer facing a squeeze bet, and therefore do not have the opportunity to fold to a squeeze bet.

Steal Statistics

Blind Stealing Attempts (BSA)

This indicates how often you attempt to steal the blinds when you had the opportunity to do so. We consider that you have a blind-stealing opportunity when you are on the button or you are the small blind (last before the blinds to make an action), and every player so far has folded. An attempt to steal the blinds is when you raised when given a blind-stealing opportunity. A good player attempts to steal the blinds often, but not always. The formula for calculating BSA is:

Blind stealing attempts % = (times blind stealing attempted) *
100 /(number of blind stealing opportunities)

Folded to Steal Attempt (FB)

This measures how often you are facing a blind steal attempt and you fold either the small blind or the big blind. Either the button or the small blind may have made a blind steal attempt. Note that if the button is trying to steal but the small blind has already called the bet, then the big blind is not facing a blind steal attempt. The formula for calculating FB is:

Folded blind to steal attempt % = (times folded blind to steal attempt) * 100 / (number of times facing a steal attempt)

Note: Many players prefer to only measure “Fold Big Blind to steal attempt” (FBB), because it is a harder decision to make than folding the small blind, and thus reveals more about a player’s tendencies. This is especially important when trying to minimize the size of your HUD statistics panel.

Called steal attempt (CS)

This measures how often you were one of the blinds, facing a steal attempt, and called the steal attempt.

Called steal attempt % = (times called steal attempt) * 100 / (number of times facing a steal attempt)

Note that if the small blind calls the steal attempt, the big blind is not considered to be facing a steal attempt.

Raised steal attempt (RS)

This is also known as a resteal attempt.

This measures how often you responded to a steal attempt by reraising. Blind restealing is an aggressive move that can help shut down overly keen blind stealers.

Raised steal attempt % = (times raised steal attempt) * 100 / (number of times facing a steal attempt)

Folded to resteal attempt (FR)

This measures how often you responded to a resteal attempt by folding. That is, you tried to steal the blinds, and either the small blind or the big blind responded by reraising your raise.

Folded to resteal attempt = (times folded to resteal attempt) * 100 / (number of times facing a resteal attempt)

Postflop Statistics

Postflop Aggression Frequency (Agg)

This indicates how aggressive you are post-flop. It is calculated by counting the number of hands in which you’ve either bet or raised, then dividing this by the number of hands in which you’ve either bet, raised, called, or folded, and multiplying by 100. The higher this number, the more aggressively you are playing. Note that this measure must be interpreted in combination with Flops Seen. Players who see very few flops will naturally tend to have a higher aggression percentage because they are only playing top-quality hole cards. The formula for calculating Agg is:

Aggression frequency % = (times bet or raised post-flop) * 100 /(times bet, raised, called, or folded post-flop)

Postflop Aggression Factor (AF)

This is calculated by counting the number of hands in which you’ve either bet or raised post-flop, then dividing this by the number of hands in which you’ve called post-flop. This value ranges from zero to infinity, which makes it awkward to use. We include this statistic for comparisons with Poker Tracker statistics. Post-flop aggression % is a superior way of measuring aggression. The formula for calculating AF is:

Aggression factor = (times bet or raised post-flop) / (times called post-flop)

Check-raised (CR)

A check-raise is when you check, let another player bet, then raise. It is a cunning play that is best used seldom. Most players have very low check-raise percentage (10% or lower). The formula for calculating CR is:

Check-raise % = (times check-raised) * 100 / (number of check- raise opportunities)

Check raising is also broken down by street as CR_F (flop), CR_T (turn), and CR_R (river).

Folded to check-raise (FCR)

This measures how often you fold to another player’s check-raise.

Folded to check-raise % = (times folded to a check-raised) * 100 / (number of times facing a check-raise)

Notes:

  • Only hands where you made a bet on between the player’s check and raise are counted.
  • If another player bet after your bet, and before the player who checked has a chance to raise, the hand is not counted in this statistic.

Continuation Bet (CBET), Continuation Bet on flop in 3-bet+ pot (CBET_3)

A continuation bet is when you were the last to raise preflop, and hence the aggressor, and you continued that aggression on postflop by being the first to bet. The formula for calculating CBET is:

Continuation bet % = (times made a continuation bet on the flop)* 100 / (number of opportunities to make a continuation bet on the flop)

Continuation Bet is also broken down by street as CBET_F (flop), CBET_T (turn), and CBET_R (river).

Continuation Bet is also broken down into “in position” (IP) and “out of position” (OOP). You are “in position” if you are closer to the button than any other player. You are “out of position” if any player is closer to the button than you are.

Continuation Bet on flop in 3-bet+ pot (CBET_3) is a subset of Continuation Bet hands that only includes hands with at least two preflop raises.

Notes:

  • If you make a continuation bet on the flop and another player raises, we consider the preflop aggression to be ended, and you no longer have a continuation bet opportunity on the turn or river.
  • If all players check on the flop, we consider you to still have a continuation bet opportunity on the turn. Likewise if all players check on the turn, you can make a continuation bet on the river.

Folded to Continuation Bet (FCB), Folded to cbet on flop in 3-bet+ pot (FCB_3)

This indicates how you respond when you are facing a continuation bet on the flop. The formula for calculating FCB is:

Folded to continuation bet % = (times folded to continuation bet) * 100 / (facing a continuation bet)

Fold to Continuation Bet is also broken down by street as FCB_F (flop), FCB_T (turn), and FCB_R (river).

Fold to Continuation Bet is also broken down into “in position” (IP) and “out of position” (OOP). You are “in position” if you are closer to the button than the person who made the continuation bet. You are “out of position” if the person who made the continuation bet is closer to the button than you are.

Be careful not to rely on FCB_T and FCB_R without checking the sample size. Most players have very few opportunities to fold to a continuation bet on the river, and hence this statistic is best used with players whom you’ve seen many times, or when analyzing your own play.

Folded to cbet on flop in 3-bet+ pot (FCB_3) is a subset of Folded to Continuation Bet that only includes hands with at least two preflop raises.

Raised Continuation Bet (RCB)

This measures how often you raise another player’s continuation bet.

Raised continuation bet % = (time raised continuation bet) * 100 / (facing a continuation bet)

All streets are taken into account. If you faced a continuation bet on at least one street in a hand, this statistic will reflect that.

Folded to Raised Continuation Bet (FRCB)

This measures how often you folded when a player raised your continuation bet. Hands are not included if you were not the player making the continuation bet.

Folded to raised continuation bet = (times folded to raised continuation bet) * 100 / (facing a raised continuation bet)

This statistic is a specialized tool for heads-up players. Most players are unlikely to ever have enough data to be able to use this statistic meaningfully to analyze opponents.

Donk Bet (DB)

This measures how often a player makes a donk bet. A player makes a donk bet when he was the caller pre-flop, yet opens with a bet on the flop, turn or river.
An example: Player A was the last to raise pre-flop. Player B called Player A’s raise pre-flop. Now on the flop, before the action gets to Player A, Player B opened with a bet. B makes a donk bet.
The formula for calculating DB is:

Donk bet % = (times donk bet) * 100 / (number of donk bet opportunities)

Donk Bet is also broken down by street as DB_F (flop), DB_T (turn), and DB_R (river).

Donk Bet is also broken down into “in position” (IP) and “out of position” (OOP). You are “in position” if you are closer to the button than the final preflop raiser. You are “out of position” if the final preflop raiser is closer to the button than you are.

Folded to Donk Bet (FDB), Called Donk Bet (CDB)

These measure how often a player folds or calls when he was the preflop aggressor and is now facing a donk bet. Only hands where the preflop aggressor is facing a donk bet are included. Other players who reached the flop, but didn’t make the final preflop raise are not included in these statistics.

Folded to donk bet % = (times folded to donk bet when preflop aggressor) * 100 / (facing a donk bet when preflop aggressor)

Called donk bet % = (times called donk bet when preflop aggressor) * 100 / (facing a donk bet when preflop aggressor)

Folded to Donk Bet is also broken down into “in position” (IP) and “out of position” (OOP). You are “in position” if you are closer to the button than the player who made the donk bet. You are “out of position” if the player making the donk bet is closer to the button than you are.

Went to Showdown (WtS)

This is a measure of how often you were still in the action when the hand went to showdown. Showdown occurs when the final round of betting is complete and at least two players are still in. The formula for calculating WtS is:

Went to showdown % = (times went to showdown) * 100 / (times flop seen)

Won at Showdown (WaS)

This indicates how often you won a hand in a showdown. It is calculated as a percentage of all hands in which you went to showdown. The formula for calculating WaS is:

Won at showdown % = (times won at showdown) * 100 / (times went to showdown)

Won Without Showdown (WwS)

This indicates how often you won a hand without going to showdown because all other players folded. It is calculated as a percentage of hands where you saw the flop. The formula for calculating WwS is:

Won without showdown % = (times won without showdown) * 100 / (times flop seen)

Other Statistics

M-ratio (M)

This measures the health of your chip stack and represents the number of passes of the dealer button (some talk of “orbits”) you can survive without winning or losing any chips. Your M-ratio is an important number to be aware of during tournament play. The formula for calculating M is:

M-ratio = (Stack Size) / ((Small Blind) + (Big Blind) + (Total antes))

Example # 1: 9 players table, SB = 15, BB = 30, Stack = 900 chips, M = 900/ (15+30) = 20
Example # 2: 9 players table, SB = 100, BB = 200, Ante = 20, Stack = 2880 chips, M = 2880/ (100+200+ (9 × 20)) = 6

Big Blinds Remaining (BB)

This is a measure of the amount of money you have expressed as a number of big blinds. For example, if you have $3.00 at a table where the big blind is $0.10, then you have 30 big blinds. The big blind information is contained in your hand history files. This means we only know about a blind increase after the first hand with the increase. So for the first hand after a blind increase, we’ll show BB remaining calculation using the blind levels in the previous hand.